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English Quiz for LIC AAO 2019

Directions (1-8): Read the following passage and answer the following questions. Some words are highlighted to help students to answer some of the questions.
The early Elizabethan drama, before the regular playhouses were constructed, permeated a broad gamut of the social life of the times. Nicholas Udall’s plays were school plays enacted by the boys as part of the liberalized school curriculum. In spite of their amateur playing, the boys used to be requisitioned to stage the plays before the royal dignitaries or in the court itself. The early English tragedy had its advent at the Inns of the Court. Gorboduc was written and produced by two lawyers at the Inner Temple. Oxford and Cambridge became important centers for staging Latin drama, so much so that even Queen Elizabeth used to visit the universities to witness the performances. Later, the royal court, with the ostensible purpose of regulating theatre, assumed the function of theatrical organization, providing grants and costumes to several amateur boy groups. John Lyly staged several comedies for Queen Elizabeth and established the genre of Elizabethan comedy. Tragedy, however, could not find patronage either at the royal court or in London. It had to await the advent of adult acting companies and the erection of Public theatres on the outskirts of London. It is in these theatres like the Curtain, the Rose, and the Globe, that the Elizabethan stage came into being, a stage that introduced the plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare.

While the growth of Elizabethan drama as a native tradition was a steady one moving self-assuredly without meekly copying classical models, the same would not have been possible without Elizabethan Drama registering itself as significant European theatre since the Greek drama of the fifth century B.C. In its European phase, Elizabethan theatre not only integrated within itself various elements of classical drama but also the Greek formulations about comedy and tragedy. The task for the Elizabethans was not only to be forcefully English but also thoughtfully European and distinctively Elizabethan.

The Latin form, with its division into five acts, of the plays of Terence and Plautus structured English romantic comedy right from Ralph Roister Doister. The plays abounded in classical themes like love, intrigue and friendship and character types like the braggart lover, the parasite servant, and the scheming old man. The comedy developed into two distinct traditions of the romantic and the critical comedy. Beginning with Udall’s Ralph Roister Doister, the romantic comedy grows through the court plays of Lyly like Compaspe (1581), Mother Bombie (1590) and Endimion (1583), George Peele’s The Arraignment of Paris (1584) and Robert Greene’s Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay (1590) and culminates in Shakespeare’s comedies like A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1595), As You Like It (1600) and Twelfth Night (1601). Primarily meant for aristocratic entertainment, romantic comedy pursues the theme of love—love as a blend of sentiment, foible, eccentricity, artifice, dedication and self-centredness. Romantic love is more in the nature of the ludicrous rather than the ridiculous. Melodramatic to the core and farcical in treatment, this comedy, set in a pastoral or old-world ambience, evokes a romantic mood and an atmosphere of exhilaration, celebration, chivalry and enchantment. With song and imaginative idealism, romantic comedy provides an escape route into a world of fancy and imagination from the grim realities of life.

The other tradition of comedy belongs to the redoubtable Ben Jonson who presented what are called the comedies of humour like Every Man in His Humour (1598), Volpone (1606) and The Alchemist (1610). Essentially city comedies, Jonson evolves his plays as social purgatives to the prevalent moral degradation. Funny yet serious, the laughter evoked is carefully controlled. Falling back on the tradition of rogue fiction, Jonson’s protagonists are rouges who succeed until the end by their ability to gull others for their avaricious needs. Their eventual failure is a moral corrective driven home forcefully by the playwright.

Q1. Which of the following sub-fields of English Literature are being discussed in the above passage?

 It discusses Elizabethan Poetry and English Romantic Playwright
 It discusses Elizabethan Comedy and English Tragedy.
 It discusses Greek Drama and Greek Comedy.
 Options (a) and (b)
 None of the above

Q2. What were the uses of the plays of the genre of Romantic comedy as mentioned in the passage?
(I) They provided entertainment to the ruling class.
(II) They provided an escape route into a world of fancy and imagination from the grim realities of life.
(III) They illustrated love as a blend of sentiment, foible, eccentricity, artifice, dedication and self-centredness.
 Only (I)
 Both (II) and (III)
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)
 Both (I) and (III)

Q3. What were the idiosyncrasies of the comedies of humour presented by Ben Jonson?
 The chortling conjured up was cautiously controlled.
 The leading character used to deceive others to satiate their greed.
 The plays were evolved as social purgatives to the prevalent moral degradation.
 Options (a) and (c)
 Options (a), (b) and (c)

Q4. What does the author mean by the sentence ‘Romantic love is more in the nature of the ludicrous rather than the ridiculous’?
 The drama of the Romantic love genre used to be melodramatic and funny instead of something that deserve derision.
 The drama of the Romantic love genre used to be absurd deserving disdain instead of being funny.
 The drama of the Romantic love genre used to be something that deserve insult instead of being out of place yet hilarious
 Options (b) and (c)
 None of the above

Q5. What are the elements of the Elizabethan dramas?
(I) It had to be in English language.
(II) It had to inculcate the elements of European theatre and Greek formulations about comedy and tragedy.
(III) It had to be displays the traits of Elizabethan.
 Only (I)
 Both (I) and (II)
 Both (II) and (III)
 Each of (I), (II) and (III)
 None of (I), (II) and (III)

Q6. Which of the following words is an ANTONYM of ‘artifice’?
 calumny
 candour
 torpor
 volubility
 prescience

Q7. Which of the followings is a SYNONYM of ‘purgatives’?
 perfidy
 gall
 culpability
 aesthete
 cathartic

Q8. Which of the followings is a SYNONYM of ‘avaricious’?
 Reticent
 Gossamer
 Apathetic
 Covetous
 Dogmatic

Directions (9-15): In the following questions a part of the sentence is given in bold, it is then followed by three sentences which try to explain the meaning of the phrase given in bold. Choose the best set of alternatives from the five options given below each question which explains the meaning of the phrase correctly without altering the meaning of the given sentence.

Q9. While the industry insists it must stick together and speak with one voice, there have been individual voices of disapproval.

(I) While the industry insists it must stick together and speak virulently, there have been individual voices of disapproval.
(II) While the industry insists it must stick together and speak concordantly, there have been individual voices of disapproval.
(III) While the industry insists it must stick together and speak in complete accord, there have been individual voices of disapproval.
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 Only (III)
 Both (II) and (III)
 Only (I)
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)

Q10. The model of perfect competition presented above is once in a blue moon in practice.
(I) The model of perfect competition presented above is very prominent in practice.
(II) The model of perfect competition presented above is very rare in practice.
(III) The model of perfect competition presented above seldom occurs in practice.
 Both (I) and (II)
 Both (II) and (III)
 Only (III)
 Only (II)
 Only (I)

Q11. ‘’Last year, my collection appeared to disappear in a few days because it sold like hot cakes,’ the author recalls proudly.’
(I) ‘’Last year, my collection appeared to disappear in a few days because it was appreciated very much,’ the author recalls proudly.
(II) ‘’Last year, my collection appeared to disappear in a few days because it was sold in large quantities,’ the author recalls proudly.’
(III) ‘’Last year, my collection appeared to disappear in a few days because it was lauded by many people,’ the author recalls proudly.’
 Only (II)
 Both (II) and (III)
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 Both (I) and (III)

Q12. At some point, Pete finished making his boat and Karina came to Cowes to launch it, but I went down with flu and couldn’t be at the ceremony.
(I) At some point, Pete finished making his boat and Karina came to Cowes to launch it, but I caught flu and couldn’t be at the ceremony.
(II) At some point, Pete finished making his boat and Karina came to Cowes to launch it, but I contracted flu and couldn’t be at the ceremony.
(III) At some point, Pete finished making his boat and Karina came to Cowes to launch it, but I succumbed to flu and couldn’t be at the ceremony.
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 Both (I) and (III)
 Both (II) and (III)
 Both (I) and (II)

Q13. He thought city people were made of money and time obliged them to pay a dollar for a loaf of bread.
(I) He thought city people were pillaging, and for a time obliged them to pay a dollar for a loaf of bread.
(II) He thought city people were inane, and for a time obliged them to pay a dollar for a loaf of bread.
(III) He thought city people were very rich, and for a time obliged them to pay a dollar for a loaf of bread.
 Only (II)
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 Only (III)
 Both (I) and (III)

Q14. The General Election campaign, to all intents and purposes, is well underway.
(I) The General Election campaign, in all important respects, is well underway.
(II) The General Election campaign, virtually, is well underway.
(III) The General Election campaign, practically, is well underway.
 Both (I) and (II)
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 Both (II) and (III)
 Both (I) and (III)
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)

Q15. The Coast Guard took this criticism to heart and proposed two significant changes to its boat defect recall laws.
(I) The Coast Guard cohered and proposed two significant changes to its boat defect recall laws.
(II) The Coast Guard construed and proposed two significant changes to its boat defect recall laws.
(III) The Coast Guard pillaged and proposed two significant changes to its boat defect recall laws.
 All of (I), (II) and (III)
 Only (I)
 Both (I) and (III)
 Only (II)
 None out of (I), (II) and (III)













SOLUTIONS

1.B
2.C
3.E
4.A
5.D
6.B
7.E
8.D
9.C
10.B
11.A
12.B
13.D
14.B
15.E

5 Banking and SSC : English Quiz for LIC AAO 2019 Directions (1-8): Read the following passage and answer the following questions. Some words are highlighted to help students to answer some...

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