GK Trick

English for IBPS Clerk Main Exam: 2019

Directions (1-6): In each of the questions given below a paragraph is given with blank spaces which are numbered. Against each numbered blank space five options are given which may or may not fill the blanks. Choose the option that can fill the blank space appropriately.

Q1. India won global acclaim for its “Beat Plastic Pollution” resolve declared on World Environment Day last year, under which it pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022. So far, 22 States and Union Territories have joined the fight, (1) ………………………………………………………… . Puducherry will implement a ban from March 1. Where firm action has been taken, positive results have followed. A Bengaluru waste collective estimates that the volume of plastic waste that they collect dropped from about two tonnes a day to less than 100 kg. Voluntary initiatives are having an impact in many States, as citizens reduce, reuse and sort their waste. (2) ……………………………………………………. Waste plastic from packaging of everything from food, cosmetics and groceries to goods delivered by online platforms remains unaddressed. It will take a paradigm shift in the manner in which waste is collected and handled by municipal authorities to change this. Governments must start charging the producers for their waste, and collect it diligently, which will lead to recovery and recycling. But the depressing reality is that State and local governments are unwilling to upgrade their waste management systems, (3) …………………… …………………………

The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 are clear that producers, importers and brand owners must adopt a collect-back system for the plastic they introduce into the environment. Although the rules were notified in the same year, amended later and given high visibility by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, (4)…………………………………………………………….. At the very least, local bodies should consult manufacturers or importers to assess the problem. Delaying such a measure has created the anomalous situation of small producers of plastics facing the ban, while more organised entities covered by the Extended Producer Responsibility clause continue with business as usual. (5)………………………………………………………………………………………., but to recover thousands of tonnes of waste that end up in dumping sites. Cities and towns need competent municipal systems to achieve this. Again, there is little doubt that plastics play a major role in several industries, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, health care and construction sectors. But it is the fast moving consumer goods sector that (6)………………………………………………………... This calls for urgent action. Governments should show the same resolve here, as they have done in imposing the ban.

 accumulating in waterways, forests, and beaches across the globe, and some of the efforts to clean and recycle the mountains of material.
 announcing a ban on single-use plastics such as carry bags, cups, plates, cutlery, straws and thermocol products.
 Plastic waste is now so ubiquitous in the natural environment that scientists have even suggested it could serve as a geological indicator of the Anthropocene era.
 one million plastic drinking bottles are purchased every minute, while up to 5 trillion single-use plastic bags are used worldwide every year.
 Both (a) and (b)

Q2. India won global acclaim for its “Beat Plastic Pollution” resolve declared on World Environment Day last year, under which it pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022. So far, 22 States and Union Territories have joined the fight, (1) ………………………………………………………… . Puducherry will implement a ban from March 1. Where firm action has been taken, positive results have followed. A Bengaluru waste collective estimates that the volume of plastic waste that they collect dropped from about two tonnes a day to less than 100 kg. Voluntary initiatives are having an impact in many States, as citizens reduce, reuse and sort their waste. (2) ……………………………………………………. Waste plastic from packaging of everything from food, cosmetics and groceries to goods delivered by online platforms remains unaddressed. It will take a paradigm shift in the manner in which waste is collected and handled by municipal authorities to change this. Governments must start charging the producers for their waste, and collect it diligently, which will lead to recovery and recycling. But the depressing reality is that State and local governments are unwilling to upgrade their waste management systems, (3) …………………… …………………………

The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 are clear that producers, importers and brand owners must adopt a collect-back system for the plastic they introduce into the environment. Although the rules were notified in the same year, amended later and given high visibility by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, (4)…………………………………………………………….. At the very least, local bodies should consult manufacturers or importers to assess the problem. Delaying such a measure has created the anomalous situation of small producers of plastics facing the ban, while more organised entities covered by the Extended Producer Responsibility clause continue with business as usual. (5)………………………………………………………………………………………., but to recover thousands of tonnes of waste that end up in dumping sites. Cities and towns need competent municipal systems to achieve this. Again, there is little doubt that plastics play a major role in several industries, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, health care and construction sectors. But it is the fast moving consumer goods sector that (6)………………………………………………………... This calls for urgent action. Governments should show the same resolve here, as they have done in imposing the ban.

 This year’s theme is “beat plastic pollution.”
 Plastic rubbish lies strewn across the polluted banks of the river Yamuna.
 Yet, this is only a small start.
 Why plastic is so bad
 Both (c) and (d)

Q3. India won global acclaim for its “Beat Plastic Pollution” resolve declared on World Environment Day last year, under which it pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022. So far, 22 States and Union Territories have joined the fight, (1) ………………………………………………………… . Puducherry will implement a ban from March 1. Where firm action has been taken, positive results have followed. A Bengaluru waste collective estimates that the volume of plastic waste that they collect dropped from about two tonnes a day to less than 100 kg. Voluntary initiatives are having an impact in many States, as citizens reduce, reuse and sort their waste. (2) ……………………………………………………. Waste plastic from packaging of everything from food, cosmetics and groceries to goods delivered by online platforms remains unaddressed. It will take a paradigm shift in the manner in which waste is collected and handled by municipal authorities to change this. Governments must start charging the producers for their waste, and collect it diligently, which will lead to recovery and recycling. But the depressing reality is that State and local governments are unwilling to upgrade their waste management systems, (3) …………………… …………………………

The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 are clear that producers, importers and brand owners must adopt a collect-back system for the plastic they introduce into the environment. Although the rules were notified in the same year, amended later and given high visibility by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, (4)…………………………………………………………….. At the very least, local bodies should consult manufacturers or importers to assess the problem. Delaying such a measure has created the anomalous situation of small producers of plastics facing the ban, while more organised entities covered by the Extended Producer Responsibility clause continue with business as usual. (5)………………………………………………………………………………………., but to recover thousands of tonnes of waste that end up in dumping sites. Cities and towns need competent municipal systems to achieve this. Again, there is little doubt that plastics play a major role in several industries, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, health care and construction sectors. But it is the fast moving consumer goods sector that (6)………………………………………………………... This calls for urgent action. Governments should show the same resolve here, as they have done in imposing the ban.

 have managed to produce over 9 billion tons of plastic till now, of which only 9 per cent could be recycled.
 making not only for the human race but also for other species.
 And we were simply not aware enough to keep them out of our lives.
 which is necessary to even measure the true scale of packaging waste.
 Both (a) and (d)

Q4. India won global acclaim for its “Beat Plastic Pollution” resolve declared on World Environment Day last year, under which it pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022. So far, 22 States and Union Territories have joined the fight, (1) ………………………………………………………… . Puducherry will implement a ban from March 1. Where firm action has been taken, positive results have followed. A Bengaluru waste collective estimates that the volume of plastic waste that they collect dropped from about two tonnes a day to less than 100 kg. Voluntary initiatives are having an impact in many States, as citizens reduce, reuse and sort their waste. (2) ……………………………………………………. Waste plastic from packaging of everything from food, cosmetics and groceries to goods delivered by online platforms remains unaddressed. It will take a paradigm shift in the manner in which waste is collected and handled by municipal authorities to change this. Governments must start charging the producers for their waste, and collect it diligently, which will lead to recovery and recycling. But the depressing reality is that State and local governments are unwilling to upgrade their waste management systems, (3) …………………… …………………………

The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 are clear that producers, importers and brand owners must adopt a collect-back system for the plastic they introduce into the environment. Although the rules were notified in the same year, amended later and given high visibility by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, (4)…………………………………………………………….. At the very least, local bodies should consult manufacturers or importers to assess the problem. Delaying such a measure has created the anomalous situation of small producers of plastics facing the ban, while more organised entities covered by the Extended Producer Responsibility clause continue with business as usual. (5)………………………………………………………………………………………., but to recover thousands of tonnes of waste that end up in dumping sites. Cities and towns need competent municipal systems to achieve this. Again, there is little doubt that plastics play a major role in several industries, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, health care and construction sectors. But it is the fast moving consumer goods sector that (6)………………………………………………………... This calls for urgent action. Governments should show the same resolve here, as they have done in imposing the ban.

 But when we finally came in line, the administration kind of loosened up with the laws and plastic bags once again made their way back into our lives.
 Both (a) and (e)
 not much has been done to take the process forward.
 but the local manufacturing units and cheap prices ruin the effort.
 And home delivery is a rising trend now

Q5. India won global acclaim for its “Beat Plastic Pollution” resolve declared on World Environment Day last year, under which it pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022. So far, 22 States and Union Territories have joined the fight, (1) ………………………………………………………… . Puducherry will implement a ban from March 1. Where firm action has been taken, positive results have followed. A Bengaluru waste collective estimates that the volume of plastic waste that they collect dropped from about two tonnes a day to less than 100 kg. Voluntary initiatives are having an impact in many States, as citizens reduce, reuse and sort their waste. (2) ……………………………………………………. Waste plastic from packaging of everything from food, cosmetics and groceries to goods delivered by online platforms remains unaddressed. It will take a paradigm shift in the manner in which waste is collected and handled by municipal authorities to change this. Governments must start charging the producers for their waste, and collect it diligently, which will lead to recovery and recycling. But the depressing reality is that State and local governments are unwilling to upgrade their waste management systems, (3) …………………… …………………………

The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 are clear that producers, importers and brand owners must adopt a collect-back system for the plastic they introduce into the environment. Although the rules were notified in the same year, amended later and given high visibility by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, (4)…………………………………………………………….. At the very least, local bodies should consult manufacturers or importers to assess the problem. Delaying such a measure has created the anomalous situation of small producers of plastics facing the ban, while more organised entities covered by the Extended Producer Responsibility clause continue with business as usual. (5)………………………………………………………………………………………., but to recover thousands of tonnes of waste that end up in dumping sites. Cities and towns need competent municipal systems to achieve this. Again, there is little doubt that plastics play a major role in several industries, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, health care and construction sectors. But it is the fast moving consumer goods sector that (6)………………………………………………………... This calls for urgent action. Governments should show the same resolve here, as they have done in imposing the ban.

 In India, which accounts for almost 18% of the world population in 2.4% of the global land area, the accumulation of plastic waste is huge
 Such enforcement failure is not an argument in favour of relaxing the prohibition on flimsy plastics that are typically used for under 15 minutes
 Worldwide, one million plastic bags and one million plastic bottles are used every minute
 The economic impact of plastic pollution on marine ecosystems through fisheries and tourism losses and beach cleaning-up costs is estimated to be around $13 billion per year.
 None of the Above

Q6. India won global acclaim for its “Beat Plastic Pollution” resolve declared on World Environment Day last year, under which it pledged to eliminate single-use plastic by 2022. So far, 22 States and Union Territories have joined the fight, (1) ………………………………………………………… . Puducherry will implement a ban from March 1. Where firm action has been taken, positive results have followed. A Bengaluru waste collective estimates that the volume of plastic waste that they collect dropped from about two tonnes a day to less than 100 kg. Voluntary initiatives are having an impact in many States, as citizens reduce, reuse and sort their waste. (2) ……………………………………………………. Waste plastic from packaging of everything from food, cosmetics and groceries to goods delivered by online platforms remains unaddressed. It will take a paradigm shift in the manner in which waste is collected and handled by municipal authorities to change this. Governments must start charging the producers for their waste, and collect it diligently, which will lead to recovery and recycling. But the depressing reality is that State and local governments are unwilling to upgrade their waste management systems, (3) …………………… …………………………

The Plastic Waste Management Rules, 2016 are clear that producers, importers and brand owners must adopt a collect-back system for the plastic they introduce into the environment. Although the rules were notified in the same year, amended later and given high visibility by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, (4)…………………………………………………………….. At the very least, local bodies should consult manufacturers or importers to assess the problem. Delaying such a measure has created the anomalous situation of small producers of plastics facing the ban, while more organised entities covered by the Extended Producer Responsibility clause continue with business as usual. (5)………………………………………………………………………………………., but to recover thousands of tonnes of waste that end up in dumping sites. Cities and towns need competent municipal systems to achieve this. Again, there is little doubt that plastics play a major role in several industries, notably in the automotive, pharmaceutical, health care and construction sectors. But it is the fast moving consumer goods sector that (6)………………………………………………………... This calls for urgent action. Governments should show the same resolve here, as they have done in imposing the ban.

 responsible citizens with a determination towards maintaining cleaner surroundings.
 cannot eliminate plastic use from our day-to-day activities.
 uses large volumes of packaging, posing a higher order challenge.
 charges for plastic bag use and deposit-refund for plastic bottles may be effective options.
 None of the Above

Directions (7-11): In each of the following questions, a word has been used in sentences in THREE different ways. Choose the option corresponding to the sentence in which the usage of the word is INCORRECT or INAPPROPRIATE.

Q7. ABUNDANT

(I) While we seem to have an abundant water supply on the planet, we must be careful to not deplete it.
(II) Since the orange crops were abundant this year, orange prices are most affordable.
(III) The company made hundreds of employees abundant.
 Only (I)
 Only (II)
 Only (III)
 Both (I) and (II)
 Both (II) and (III)

Q8. NOBLE
(I) According to legends, only a truly noble man could pull the magic sword from the stone.
(II) In 2012, the Noble Prize in Literature was awarded to Mo Yan.
(III) The generous millionaire used his money for noble endeavors like building hospitals in the third world countries.
 Only (I)
 Only (II)
 Only (III)
 Both (I) and (II)
 Both (II) and (III)

Q9. AMPLE
(I) Without ample funds, we cannot afford to make two car payments.
(II) Because the house has an ample amount of space, it will be perfect for our large family.
(III) Make sure you have ample time to prepare for the new day ahead.
 Only (I)
 Only (II)
 Only (III)
 Both (I) and (II)
 All are correct

Q10. MUNIFICENT
(I) Several munificent oil paintings adorn the walls.
(II) The wealthy actor always gives the members of his staff munificent appreciation gifts.
(III) The munificent woman is a well-known philanthropist who funds many university scholarships.
 Only (I)
 Only (II)
 Only (III)
 Both (I) and (II)
 Both (II) and (III)

Q11. ALTRUISTIC
(I) The billionaire is an altruistic man who gives away millions of dollars every year to various charities.
(II) Altruistic spirit should be cultivated by us vigorously.
(III) At the same time, he envisaged these innate and largely altruistic tendencies as threatening to the social order.
 Only (I)
 Only (II)
 Only (III)
 Both (I) and (II)
 Both (II) and (III)

Directions (12-15): Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow the passage. Some words may be highlighted to help you some of the questions.

In a peace overture, India has asked Islamabad to take back dozens of Pakistani nationals who have completed jail terms here. The Indian request came in the context of the exchange of the lists of prisoners in both countries on the first day of the new year.

“India has also asked Pakistan to expedite response in the cases of 80 Pakistan prisoners who have completed their sentences and await repatriation for want of nationality confirmation by Pakistan,” the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) said in a statement after India handed over a list of 249 civilian Pakistani prisoners and 98 fishermen in its custody.

Pakistan shared lists of 54 civilian prisoners and 483 fishermen in its jails, who it claims are Indian.

Of the total number of Indian prisoners, Delhi has asked Islamabad to release 17 civilian prisoners and 369 fishermen whose nationality has been confirmed. The MEA said India had shared details of the reconstituted Joint Judicial Committee and of the medical professionals who are expected to visit Pakistan to help the elderly and mentally unsound Indian prisoners.

Q12. How does the author view India asking Islamabad to take back dozens of Pakistani nationals who have completed jail terms in India?

 An act of patriotism
 Peace proposal
 An act to save money spent on feeding Pakistani prisoners
 Either option (a) or (c) but NOT (b)
 None of the above

Q13. Why India asked Pakistan to release 17 civilian prisoners and 369 fishermen when the list which Pakistan shared with India has greater number of civilian prisoners and fishermen who are in custody of Pakistan?
 The 17 civilian prisoners and 369 fishermen are wanted in India for some other crimes.
 Only those prisoners and fishermen were asked to be released whose family members requested the appropriate authorities in India for their release.
 India doesn’t consider the remaining civilian prisoners and fishermen its citizen.
 Options (a) and (c)
 The nationality of only 17 civilian prisoners and 369 fishermen has been confirmed

Q14. Which of the followings could be inferred from the last part of the last sentence of the last paragraph ‘the medical professionals who are expected to visit Pakistan to help the elderly and mentally unsound Indian prisoners’?
(I) Pakistan doesn’t provide medical facilities to the Indian prisoners in its prisons.
(II) Pakistan faces severe shortage of medical professionals who could provide medical aid to prisoners.
(III) India doesn’t want its prisoners in Pakistani prison to be treated by Pakistani medical professionals.
 Only (I) & (II)
 Only (I) & (III)
 Only (II) & (III)
 All of (I), (II) & (III)
 None of (I), (II) & (III)

Q15. Which of the following words has a meaning which is SIMILAR to the meaning of ‘expedite’?
 maintain
 intimate
 chastise
 hasten
 galvanise












SOLUTIONS

1.B
2.C
3.D
4.C
5.B
6.C
7.C
8.B
9.E
10.A
11.C
12.B
13.E
14.E
15.D
5 Banking and SSC : English for IBPS Clerk Main Exam: 2019 Directions (1-6): In each of the questions given below a paragraph is given with blank spaces which are numbered. Against each numbered bla...

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